Cancer prevention – one-third of all cancer cases are preventable

Cancer prevention – one-third of all cancer cases are preventable

At least one-third of all cancer cases are preventable. Prevention offers the most cost-effective long-term strategy for the control of cancer, says World Health Organization. Followings are various factors which … continue reading

Influenza Epidemic – Different Presentations & Homeopathic Medicines

At this time, there are several different viral infections going around. Each infection actually has a slightly different presentation. As you are aware, the number of people ill with some … continue reading

H1N1 flu :: Pandemic swine flu – H1N1 Influenza

Novel H1N1 (referred to as “swine flu” early on) is a new influenza virus causing illness in people. This new virus was first detected in people in the United States in April 2009. Other countries, including Mexico and Canada, have reported people sick with this new virus. This virus is spreading from person-to-person, probably in much the same way that regular seasonal influenza viruses spread.

Cancer :: Scientific evidence of the significant anti-cancer effect of milk thistle

Recently, scientists demonstrated the anti-cancer effects of silibinin, a major biologically active compound of milk thistle. Being widely used as a folk remedy for liver diseases, milk thistle is safe and well-tolerated, and it protects the liver from drug or alcohol-related injury. Silibinin is highly purified from milk thistle, with a defined chemical structure and molecular weight (C25H22O10, MW: 482.44).

Obesity :: Possible link between obesity and viral infections

Experts don’t dispute the important role that diet and activity play in maintaining a healthy weight. But can poor eating habits and a less active lifestyle fully explain the prevalence of obesity in the United States today? That question has led some researchers to ask whether there might be other causes for this serious problem. In the October issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, researcher Richard Atkinson, M.D., asserts that there is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that viruses may play a role in causing obesity in humans.