Cancer prevention – one-third of all cancer cases are preventable

At least one-third of all cancer cases are preventable. Prevention offers the most cost-effective long-term strategy for the control of cancer, says World Health Organization. Followings are various factors which are preventable. 1. Tobacco Tobacco use is the single greatest avoidable risk factor for cancer mortality worldwide, causing an estimated 22% of cancer deaths per … Read more

Higher BMI increases gallstones risk

Elevated body mass index (BMI) is tied to increased risk of gallstone disease, especially in women, a new study has claimed. Researchers led by Dr Anne Tybjaerg-Hansen from Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital in Denmark studied 77,679 participants from the general population, employing a Mendelian randomisation approach. Its a method using genetic variation to study the … Read more

Prostate Cancer :: Obesity and overweight linked to higher prostate cancer mortality

Men who are overweight or obese when diagnosed with prostate cancer are at greater risk of death after treatment, according to a new study in the December 15, 2007 issue of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The study, by Dr. Jason Efstathiou from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and colleagues, found that a greater body mass index (BMI) at the time of cancer diagnosis was an independent risk factor for prostate cancer-related death.

Read moreProstate Cancer :: Obesity and overweight linked to higher prostate cancer mortality

Obesity :: Genes may make some people more motivated to eat, perhaps overeat

Science has found one likely contributor to the way that some folks eat to live and others live to eat. Researchers at the University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, have found that people with genetically lower dopamine, a neurotransmitter that helps make behaviors and substances more rewarding, find food to be more reinforcing than people without that genotype. In short, they are more motivated to eat and they eat more.

Blood Pressure :: Women with high or increasing blood pressure are up to three times more likely to develop diabetes

One of the largest studies to investigate the relationship between blood pressure and type 2 diabetes has found that women who have high blood pressure levels are three times more likely to develop diabetes than women with low blood pressure levels. This effect was independent of body mass index and other conditions that are known to predispose people to cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

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