Weight Loss :: A spoonful of sugar helps your waistline go down

A new study challenges conventional thinking that a high carbohydrate, low fat slimming plan should contain little or no added sugar. A team of scientists at Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh has found that a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet — containing sucrose — combined with physical activity achieved the greatest health benefits in overweight subjects.

Diabetes :: Type 1 diabetes and heart disease – Heavier may mean healthier

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences studying links between an early sign of heart disease called coronary artery calcification and body fat have found that, paradoxically, more fat may have some advantages, at least for people ? particularly women ? who have type 1 diabetes.

Stroke :: More women than men having mid-life stroke

More women than men appear to be having a stroke in middle age, according to a study published June 20, 2007, in the online edition of Neurology?, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Researchers say heart disease and increased waist size may be contributing to this apparent mid-life stroke surge among women.

Healthy :: College students less healthy than they think

Obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and inactivity: they?re not just your father?s problems any more, University of New Hampshire research finds. New data on the widely unstudied demographic of college students indicates that this group of 18 ? 24-year-olds are on the path toward chronic health diseases. Although limited, national data suggest the trend is not unique to UNH.

Diet :: Dietary preferences and patterns may be linked to genes

The relative amount of protein, carbohydrate, and fat that people choose to eat may be influenced by genetics, according to new research. Jose Ordovas, PhD, director of the Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University (USDA HNRCA), and colleagues found that the apolipoprotein A-II gene (APOA2) is associated with proportions of fat, carbohydrate, and protein in the diet, along with total calories and, therefore, with body-mass-index (BMI).

Metabolic Syndrome :: Metabolic syndrome points to heart health

Typified by high blood pressure, weight gain around the waist and problems regulating blood sugar, metabolic syndrome may also be associated with compromised heart structure and function, according to a paper published in the online open access journal BMC Cardiovascular Disorders.

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