Bird Flu :: New research shows how H5N1 virus causes disease

H5N1 influenza, also known as avian influenza, is considered a major global threat to human health, with high fatality rates. While little had been known about the specific effects of H5N1 on organs and cells targeted by the virus, researchers at Beijing University, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, and SUNY Downstate report in the September 29, 2007 issue of the Lancet detailed studies of human H5N1 victims that shed light on the anatomic distribution of the virus and its pathogenesis.

Bird Flu :: New field-deployable biosensor detects avian influenza virus in minutes instead of days

Quick identification of avian influenza infection in poultry is critical to controlling outbreaks, but current detection methods can require several days to produce results. A new biosensor developed at the Georgia Tech Research Institute can detect avian influenza in just minutes. In addition to being a rapid test, the biosensor is economical, field-deployable, sensitive to different viral strains and requires no labels or reagents.

Bird Flu :: Lab-on-a-chip Device to Transform Field Testing for Avian Flu Virus, Singapore

Researchers at the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN), Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB) and Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) have successfully developed a miniaturized device that can be used to detect the highly pathogenic avian flu (H5N1) virus.

Bird Flu :: Crucell to present pre-clinical results for H5N1 Virus treatment

Dutch biotechnology company Crucell N.V. (Euronext, NASDAQ: CRXL, Swiss Exchange: CRX) announced that its researchers have discovered a monoclonal antibody that is active against H5N1 avian influenza. The studies will be presented at the 5th International Bird Flu Summit scheduled for September 27 and 28 in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Bird Flu :: Study confirms limited human-to-human spread of avian-flu virus in Indonesia in 2006

In the first systematic, statistical analysis of its kind, infectious-disease-modeling experts at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center confirm that the avian influenza A (H5N1) virus in 2006 spread between a small number of people within a family in Indonesia.

Bird Flu :: 2 bird flu positive cases dead in Bali, Indonesia

AS (f, 28 years) who lived in Banjar Batu Gaing, Baraban, Kediri, Tabanan Bali died on August 21, 2007 at 01.30 p.m. at Sanglah Hospital. She was identified positive of avian influenza (AI) based on observation of Balitbangkes and Eijkman Laboratory. Therefore, there are 2 AI positive cases dead in Bali.

Bird Flu :: Indonesia send again H5N1 Virus to WHO

Indonesia has sent specimen of H5N1 virus to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, (CDC Atlanta), USA, on Thursday, August 16, 2007. It is sent by National Institute of Health Research & Development (Balitbangkes) MOH through NAMRU-2 (Naval Medical Research Unit-2) USA, which is located in Balitbangkes building at Jl. Percetakan Negara, Jakarta.

Bird Flu :: Second bird flu victim confirmed from Bali, Indonesia

Test results from the Health Research and Development Center of the Ministry of Health and the Eijkman Insitute in Jakarta have confirmed that AS, a 28-year old female from Banjar Batu Gaing, Baraban, Kediri, Tabanan District in Bali is the most recent confirmed H5N1 case in Indonesia.

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