Added sugar increases risk of heart disease

A new study reveals that eating too much sugar is bad for our heart and could lead to an earlier death. The research examined nutrition surveys from nearly 12,000 Americans and found that those who reported consuming the greatest percentage of calories from added sugar were twice as likely to die from heart disease over … Read more

Higher BMI increases gallstones risk

Elevated body mass index (BMI) is tied to increased risk of gallstone disease, especially in women, a new study has claimed. Researchers led by Dr Anne Tybjaerg-Hansen from Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital in Denmark studied 77,679 participants from the general population, employing a Mendelian randomisation approach. Its a method using genetic variation to study the … Read more

Use of Coconut in Ayurveda, Unani and Siddha

The coconut palm, Cocos nucifera, is a member of the family Arecaceae. It is the only accepted species in the genus Cocos. The term coconut can refer to the entire coconut palm, the seed, or the fruit, which, botanically, is a drupe, not a nut. Coconut has been traditionally used in Ayurveda, Unani and Siddha … Read more

Decaffeinated coffee preserves memory by improving brain energy

Decaffeinated coffee may improve brain energy metabolism associated with type 2 diabetes. This brain dysfunction is a known risk factor for dementia and other neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer’s disease.

Read moreDecaffeinated coffee preserves memory by improving brain energy

Rheumatoid Arthritis :: Cardiovascular Disease Risk for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

People with rheumatoid arthritis have a higher risk for developing heart disease than the general population; however, it is difficult to identify which patients are at increased risk. Researchers at Mayo Clinic have developed a simple approach to predict heart disease in these patients within ten years of their initial diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis.

Lupus :: Research suggests targeted treatment strategies for lupus

New research provides clues about the causes of lupus symptoms and suggests specific new targeted treatment strategies, according to Nilamadham Mishra, M.D., from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, in presentations this week at the American College of Rheumatology in Boston.

Chocolate :: People are programmed to love chocolate – chocolate lover

For the first time, scientists have linked the all-too-human preference for a food — chocolate — to a specific, chemical signature that may be programmed into the metabolic system and is detectable by laboratory tests. The signature reads ‘chocolate lover’ in some people and indifference to the popular sweet in others, the researchers say.

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